Diabetes Risk Assessment

Are you at risk?

Diabetes rates in the nation are increasing right along with obesity and sedentary lifestyles. In Lancaster County, one-third of newborns are at risk of developing diabetes in their lifetime. Diabetes can lead to blindness, stroke, heart disease, kidney disease, nerve damage, and other serious health problems, including death.


Choices that you make every day will impact your chances of developing diabetes—and of living a healthier life even if you already have diabetes.

 

What is a diabetes risk assessment?

A diabetes risk assessment is a tool used by health professionals and others to assess a person’s risk of diabetes. The results are an estimate of your risk of developing diabetes. Only a qualified healthcare provider can determine whether or not you have diabetes.

 

Why should you do a diabetes risk assessment?

There are over 29 million Americans with diabetes (nearly 9.3% of the population). Over 8 million of these people are undiagnosed. It is important that you conduct a risk assessment to see if you may be at risk for having or for developing diabetes. Diabetes is more common among African Americans, Latinos, American Indian/Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. If you are a member of one of these groups, you should pay special attention to your risk estimate and do all you can to lower it. By doing a risk assessment, you get an estimate of your risk of diabetes.

 

Why should you do the following activity?

To find out if you are at risk, complete the diabetes risk assessment below or download and print it to do at your own pace. If you score more than 10 points and have not already discussed your personal chances of getting diabetes with your healthcare provider, you should make an appointment and ask what actions you need to be taking now that can help you prevent diabetes. Whatever your score is, take action now for a long and healthy life!

 

Risk Assessment Test

Instructions:

To find out if you are at risk, answer the following questions by putting a check in the box if the statement is true for you. Leave the box blank if the question is NOT true for you. Then click the CALCULATE button to view your score.

   I am a woman who had a baby weighing more than nine pounds at birth.

   I have a sister or brother with diabetes.

   I have a parent with diabetes.

   I am less than 65 years of age and I get little or no exercise.

   I am less than 45 years of age.
   I am between 45 and 64 years of age.
    I am 65 years old or older.

Weight in pounds:    Height in feet:   inches:  

 

Your Score:

Very Low Risk (0–2 points)

If your score is between 0 and 2 points, you currently have a low risk for developing type 2 diabetes.  Keep your risk low by taking the 1-2-3 Action Steps.

Low to Medium Risk (3–9 points)

If your score is between 3 and 9 points, you currently have a low to medium risk for developing type 2 diabetes.  Please re-take the risk assessment every few years. Although anyone may be at higher risk in the future, this is especially true if you are of  African American, Latino, American Indian/Alaska Natives, Asian American, or Pacific Islander decent, or have other risk factors for diabetes.


At your next office visit with your healthcare provider, share the results of this risk assessment and ask for information on what steps you need to take now to help prevent diabetes and its complications. Meanwhile, keep your risk as low as possible by taking the 1-2-3 Action Steps.

High Risk (10 or more points)

If you scored 10 or more points, you are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. But only a qualified healthcare provider can determine whether or not you have diabetes.  At your next office visit, share the results of this risk assessment and ask for information on what steps you need to take now to help prevent diabetes and its complications.


Meanwhile, keep your risk as low as possible by taking the 1-2-3 Action Steps. Small dietary changes and increased physical activity can go a long way toward improving health and preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes.

 

Copyright © 2005 American Diabetes Association. From www.diabetes.org. Reprinted with permission from the American Diabetes Association.

 

Please Note:  Information contained in this website is not to be used as a substitute for sound medical advice or treatment.  As always, it is important to consult your doctor or healthcare professional about all matters that relate to your personal health.